One of the early motivations for founding the Tourist was our collective desire to establish a platform for long-form photo essays. With the rise of ‘digital’ and the substantial decline of ‘print’, we believed that photo essays were largely suffering - the content was of course there but the platforms were lacking in the manner in which they presented essays. Online, photo essays were given little ‘real estate’; often reduced to small ‘click through’ features on websites that were plastered with animated banner ads, surrounding copy, pop up vokens and other elements that suffocated the essay at hand. In publications, many of which were physically becoming smaller, featuring less pages and more multi-page advertorials, photo essays were being chopped down; an impressive body of work today is often sadly reduced to a few small images over 2-3 pages. What a drag, hey? Luckily, there are some photo enthusiasts whose passion drives innovation which, in turn, has led to new, exciting platforms for photo essays. Julie Grahame is one of those innovators. Her fantastic website aCurator (which she describes as a full-screen photography magazine) features beautifully selected photo essays that run the gamut from music-based essays to travel-based essays to personal essays and beyond. The site’s minimal, tonal design and ‘full screen’ functionality enables its photo essays to breathe in a manner that is overly lacking online. aCurator combines the ‘bigness’ we love about ‘print’ with the interactive repository element we love about ‘digital’. So pray for a rainy day and spend hours getting lost on aCurator - you’ll love it like we do. Top line image by Leland Bobbé from his New York City’s Seamy 70s series.

One of the early motivations for founding the Tourist was our collective desire to establish a platform for long-form photo essays. With the rise of ‘digital’ and the substantial decline of ‘print’, we believed that photo essays were largely suffering - the content was of course there but the platforms were lacking in the manner in which they presented essays. Online, photo essays were given little ‘real estate’; often reduced to small ‘click through’ features on websites that were plastered with animated banner ads, surrounding copy, pop up vokens and other elements that suffocated the essay at hand. In publications, many of which were physically becoming smaller, featuring less pages and more multi-page advertorials, photo essays were being chopped down; an impressive body of work today is often sadly reduced to a few small images over 2-3 pages. What a drag, hey? Luckily, there are some photo enthusiasts whose passion drives innovation which, in turn, has led to new, exciting platforms for photo essays. Julie Grahame is one of those innovators. Her fantastic website aCurator (which she describes as a full-screen photography magazine) features beautifully selected photo essays that run the gamut from music-based essays to travel-based essays to personal essays and beyond. The site’s minimal, tonal design and ‘full screen’ functionality enables its photo essays to breathe in a manner that is overly lacking online. aCurator combines the ‘bigness’ we love about ‘print’ with the interactive repository element we love about ‘digital’. So pray for a rainy day and spend hours getting lost on aCurator - you’ll love it like we do. Top line image by Leland BobbĂ© from his New York City’s Seamy 70s series.

  1. wizzkid7 reblogged this from thetouristzine
  2. thetouristzine posted this